Responding to Employees’ Questions: Tell, Teach, or Ask?

Asking questions to gather knowledge is a major learning method for employees at all levels of an organization, and it a major responsibility of the manager to help them. Let’s say that in the course of your daily work, an employee comes to you with a situation that she doesn’t know how to handle. She may have tried one or more ways to solve the problem, but they didn’t resolve the situation. It doesn’t matter what kind of challenge the employee is facing – it could be an imperfect product coming from the manufacturing process, a customer complaint she can’t resolve, a line of programming code she can’t get to work, or a medical procedure about which she is uncertain. Your goal as a manager should be not just to get the situation resolved, but also to help the employee learn how to solve similar problems in the future.

These types of situations arise every day, often multiple times in a day. So, as a manager, how do you respond? Here are some common responses that employees often hear from their managers.

“Don’t bother me. Figure it out yourself.”
“Just leave it with me and I’ll take care of it.”
“Why don’t you ask Fred or Mary to show you how to do that?”
“Here’s what you need to do”
“Let me show you how to do that.”
“What do you think you should do?”

Let’s look at each response from the perspective of both the manager and the employee.

“Don’t bother me. Figure it out yourself.”

As a manager, you have a lot on your plate. Perhaps you think this employee already knows how to answer the question or solve the problem, but is relying too much on your assistance – perhaps she doesn’t have the self-assurance to solve the problem without getting your approval first. Or, perhaps, you already answered a similar question for this employee several times and feel that the employee should be able to extrapolate the right answer from other answers you have already given.

From your perspective as a manager, this answer will get rid of a potential time-sink and allow you to work on matters you think more important. Having received this response, the employee has three options:

She can come up with a solution that may or may not work. If it works, that’s great. If it doesn’t work, she can blame her manager for not helping her. From your managerial perspective, this is not an optimal solution – the problem may not get solved, and the employee has learned nothing about how to solve such problems herself in the future, so she will continue coming to you every time she faces a problem.
She can go to someone else in the group to see if they can help her – perhaps they have faced this situation before and know how to solve the problem. This may or may not result in a successful resolution, depending on the knowledge and experience of the person she approaches and their willingness to help her.
She can abandon the problem, feeling that if the manager doesn’t think it important enough to help her solve, it must not be very important. This is not a very satisfying result for the employee – the problem isn’t getting solved and whoever relies on her work, be it a customer, a supplier, or some other internal or external person or group, is stuck with the problem and no solution. It also shouldn’t be a satisfying result for the manager – there is a problem for which your group is responsible that is not getting solved, and the employee feels that you are not supporting her.

“Just leave it with me and I’ll take care of it.”

From the manager’s perspective, this may be the quickest solution. The manager knows how to solve the problem and can get it done quickly without having to take the time to explain the solution to the employee. It also ensures that the problem will get fixed correctly (at least from the manager’s view).

But how does the employee feel when this happens? He may be relieved that the doesn’t have to worry about the problem anymore and can move on to other work at which he feels more competent. But he may also feel dejected because he feels that he should have been able to solve the problem and by taking it to his manager, he is admitting weakness. The last common feeling invoked from this response it that the manager doesn’t value the employee enough to explain the answer and teach him how to solve such problems in the future.

“Why don’t you ask Fred or Mary to show you how to do that?”

This is a better response than the first two. As a manager, you are recognizing that the employee needs to learn how to solve the problem, and are delegating responsibility for teaching the employee to another of your employees. Assuming that Fred or Mary is willing and able to teach the employee, this is a good solution. It ensures that the problem will get solved (assuming that Fred and Mary know how), that the employee will learn the correct procedure, and it doesn’t take time from your other managerial work.

“Here’s what you need to do”

Simple. Straightforward. Gets the problem solved.

And, sometimes, it is necessary. If there is an immediate danger or if the situation requires an immediate response, this will get the job done. When I had a heart attack and was in the hospital emergency room and my heart stopped, I didn’t want the doctors to have a discussion about what to do. I needed immediate action. Similarly, if you are in the control room of a nuclear power plant and alarms start ringing, you don’t want to take a lot of time discussing what you should do – you need to act immediately.

For the employee, there is great relief – the problem will now get solved. Assuming the employee retains the memory of the situation and the solution to that situation, she may be able to replicate the solution if the exact same problem arises again. But has the employee really learned anything? If a similar, but not identical situation arises in the future, will the employee be able to derive a solution without going to the manager again.

The best course of action for the manager in this situation is to first get the problem solved by issuing a directive, but then to sit down with the employee to explain how to diagnose similar problems in the future and how to derive the correct solution. That is, to teach the employee.

“Let me show you how to do that.”

This is a great solution. Here the manager is taking the time to teach the employee how to solve problems, to develop the employee’s skills for the future. The manager’s explanation can be brief (“Do these steps.”) or it can require more time if the manager instructs the employee on how to think about the problem, what alternatives to consider, and how to select the best of those alternatives. This response takes more of the manager’s time than any of the earlier responses, but it will result in more learning and a greater probability that the next time the employee faces a similar situation, he or she will be able to diagnose and solve the problem without taking more of the manager’s time.

“What do you think you should do?”

This is a coaching response, rather than a directive or teaching response. It can be useful when:

You, as the manager, don’t know the answer or are interested in exploring possible solutions with the employee.
You feel that the employee can come up with a good solution himself, but doesn’t have the self-confidence to do so.

This response answers a question with a question and implies a coaching approach. It is designed to empower the employee, as Judith Ross stated in her Harvard Business Review blog. She suggests that managers who use empowering questions “create value in one of more of the following ways:

They create clarity: “can you explain more about this situation?”
They construct better working relations: Instead of “Did you make your sales goal?” ask “How have sales been going?”
They help people think analytically and critically: “What are the consequences of going this route?”
They inspire people to reflect and see things in fresh, unpredictable ways: “Why did this work?”
They encourage breakthrough thinking: “Can that be done in any other way?”
They challenge assumptions: “What do you think you will lose if you start sharing responsibility for the implementation process?”
They create ownership of solutions: “Based on your experience, what do you suggest we do here?”

The point of coaching is to help the employee develop thinking, problem analysis, and decision-making skills. It does not imply that the manager doesn’t know what to do, although coaching questions can help both the employee and the manager analyze a problem if neither of them has a ready solution. Asking coaching questions should never be used to force an employee to select the solution that the manager already has in mind – a manager should never keep asking the employee to suggest a solution and keep the employee guessing at alternative solutions until the employee comes up with the one the manager wants – that’s not coaching, it’s manipulation.

Shoulder Holsters – Know Your Rig

Leather shoulder rigs are a true classic. Let us just name, Clint Eastwood in Dirty Harry, Steve McQueen in Bullitt, Bruce Willis in Die Hard With A Vengeance and last but not lest Don Johnson in Miami Vice. If those fellas are not the epitome of stylish then I don’t know what is. You may be asking – but are shoulder holsters for concealed carry really practical or are they just some old-timey nonsense. The answer is obvious, they are perfect for concealed carry, your daily carry, carrying in you car and also on a hike. Shoulder holsters are versatile, comfortable and reliable. This article will help you in the following:

How To Choose A Shoulder Holster

How To Adjust A Shoulder Holster

How To Wear A Shoulder Holster

How To Choose A Shoulder Holster

Choosing a shoulder holster is the first and hardest step. Let’s break it down to easy steps. You may look after it if you:

Want to conceal carry but don’t want to wear a belt holster

Want to conceal a large canon such as a 8″ revolver

Want to look cool as Dirty Harry

Let’s face it. Belt holsters can be a burden. Carrying a holster on your belt all day long just might somehow get on your nerves, pinching, printing sweating etc. Shoulder holster concealed carry can be the solution you are looking for. It’s as easy as putting on a coat. Slide your arms through the harness and you are strapped without any belt obstructions. And don’t forget that you don’t have to put your gun belt through a maze of belt loops. And you know what the best part is? Spare ammo on the other side. Concealment in a shoulder holster is as easy as putting your jacket over it and you are set. If you think your gun is larger then just go for a vertical shoulder holster. The gun will be facing downward and you will still have it within a hands reach.

The vertical shoulder holster is also a solution for people who like their guns large and loud. It denies the statement that you can’t conceal a 8″ Smith & Wesson. Yes you can in a vertical shoulder holster. And again, you have spare speedloaders on your other side. Imagine the time it would take to draw 8″ of steel from your pants and compare it to a shoulder holster where it’s just grab, break and draw. The same goes with 1911 shoulder holsters, a full size fit’s a horizontal shoulder holster well, but may be more practical in a vertical holster.

The large variety and designs of shoulder holsters can practically conceal firearms of any caliber and size. From.357 to.45, you can bet that it would function perfectly in a shoulder holster. And now to the best part of having a shoulder holster – the coolness factor. Well, I admit it’s not the best part, of course the best part is the safe carry aspect etc., etc., but you have to give some credit to the heroes of TV for making the holster look so cool. A statement to the great era of cop movies.

How To Adjust A Shoulder Holster

Now, you just received your custom made shoulder holster for a.357 revolver, it has a double speedloader counterbalance and the mahogany leather looks amazing also because you added a personal monogram to it. You unpack it a suddenly feel like you received something from IKEA. A holster, counterbalance, parts, straps, harness, ugh. Not as easy as a Kydex holster that you just hook on the belt, right? Well, maybe yes but if you want something pretty you have to do something about it.

Adjusting a shoulder holster is very important and, surprisingly, very easy. It can be broken into 3 steps:

Adjust the harness

Position the Holster

Position the counterbalance

We all come in different shapes and sizes and one thing that shoulder holsters can do is that they can be made to serve people even in XXXL sizes. Big guys. Your harness can be adjusted very easily to fit well and safely. You have to be sure that it’s tight but not too tight because your arms and upper body will move and the harness must allow movement. If you are planning to add more layers of clothing, i.e. a shirt and a sweater, just adjust the harness to be bigger or vice versa. Be sure to wear an empty rig and position the harness crossing in the middle of your back.

Make sure the straps aren’t twisted and that they lay flat against your shoulders and upper back. If your holster rig has shoulder pads, make sure they are centered front-to-back, high up on your shoulders near your neck. You may not find the perfect fit the first time you put the holster on, so pay attention to how it feels over time and adjust it. One way to test this is to stand in front of a mirror and perform a series of movements. Watch if the rig moves around a lot or stays tight. Also take notice of whether or not the harness feels comfortable when you move around.

If the harness is tight enough to your satisfaction be sure that the holster is 1 – 2 inches below your armpit. Not too hing as it would obstruct your arm movement and not too low as it would be a burden to draw. You must be able to reach around your body and instinctively find the handle of your firearm. If you prefer a shoulder rig with belt tie downs (those little straps of leather that go from the holster to your belt) just do the same and don’t forget to attach the tie downs to your belt. Their advantage is that they have a snap so you don’t have to bother with unbuckling your belt. Be sure to position the can’t of the holster to your liking and don’t get distracted if the holster moves from front to back, this happens sometimes and is not an issue.

Last but not least, your counterbalance also must be adjusted. If your shoulder rig only comes with a holster part and no pouch then the process is easy, just make sure the elastic part is not too tight and allows you to move and at the same time balances the weight of the firearm. If you have a pouch on your harness then just do the same as with the holster. Position it where you instinctively reach for a spare mag or speedloader. And you are all set.

Our Tip: Leather Shoulder Holster System

If you are looking for a versatile shoulder rig made of sturdy leather that can be adjusted easily and worn with comfort this is the one for you. You’ll get a rig with a holster and a double mag pouch – or a double speedloader pouch in the case of a revolver. It comes fully assembled so you are just a break-in away from carrying it. And if you ever feel like dual carrying you can just order a holster for the left side and mount it on easily. The holster and pouch can be tied to the belt via belt clips and the whole rig can be concealed under a layer of clothing.

How to wear a shoulder holster

If you have your shoulder rig adjusted and ready to go to action you might stumble upon a simple question – how to wear a shoulder holster? The answer will be provided below, just right now imagine you are a detective and the crooks see you taking off your jacket as you interrogate them and your 5″ chrome 1911 says “Hi!” to them. Cool, huh?

Now to the more important part. It comes to 4 easy steps:

Be sure to have a loose jacket

Be sure to keep the jacket open

Don’t forget your concealed carry permit

Practice, practice, practice.

The loose jacket doesn’t have to be 3 sizes larger than you are but a little looseness is always fine as this helps avoiding the print of the harness on your back plus the tighter the garment the more hugged the holster. But a comfort-liking man wears a comfortable jacket or shirt so there is no place to worry. Even if you suit up you can use a shoulder holster to carry your self-defense piece and people won’t notice that you are armed.

The important part of wearing a shoulder holster is draw practice, keep in mind that you’ll have to have the jacket open in order to gain fast access to the firearm. Practice this often and mind that some movement may show your gun, so don’t spin around with open arms like they do in movies. Just keep it cool and protected.

If you cover your rig with your jacket always keep in mind that it’s concealed carry so you better have that permit with you. Avoid any unnecessary conflict and just be armed, prepared and safe.

Shoulder Holster Draw

Practicing a shoulder holster draw is the key. It’s easy and can be done in 3 easy steps. The key is repetition until it becomes an instinct and intuition.

The first step is to clear your garment. This means swiping it with your non dominant hand and reaching for the handle with your dominant hand at the same time. If you don’t have a jacket or any shirt over it it’s wise to put your non dominant hand up, bend it in the elbow and just move it upwards, this will grant you easier access to your firearm and will keep your non shooting hand safe.

The second step is to reach for the firearm and get a good grip. The thumb-break can be easily broken with your thumb in the case of horizontal shoulder holster and/or with your index finger if you carry vertically.

Health Care in America Needs an Update

American health care needs an updated treatment plan. The quality of care is not the issue as we have some of the best medical care in the world. People will fly in from different countries just to take advantage of our trained medical providers. But our health care policies are very short-sighted and in need of repair. I see two major flaws with our current health care system.

One is that routine preventive health care is unaffordable for many families. For many the only type of health care that they can afford is a plan with a high deductible. This type of insurance is necessary for major injuries and life-threatening situations. But in the end it leads to a lack of preventive maintenance. With such high deductibles people are hesitant to go to a doctor for the routine care that might prevent major problems down the road. And, most high deductible plans provide no dental care at all.

This is like taking a car to a mechanic only when the engine seizes up or the transmission fails. What we should be doing is changing the oil and maintaining the air pressure in the tires. Under the current state of health care this is not possible for many. As a nation we are going to face much higher costs for medical and dental care as our population ages.

The second issue is the large number of people who do not have any insurance at all. If health insurance is anything like car insurance I am forced to pay not only for my own injuries but also for the injuries of all those who choose to go without insurance. The affordable care act, commonly known as Obamacare, made an attempt to rectify this issue. In my opinion Obamacare caused as many problems as it solved but in this one area it got it right.

Obamacare certainly isn’t perfect. And Republicans are now in the process of attempting to repeal it. I can understand their logic in doing so. However, I have not seen any type of plan they have proposed that addresses the issues of preventative care and the uninsured. Whether it is Obamacare, or some other plan, something needs to be done about the large number of American citizens who live off of the hard work of others. And the fact that preventative health care is not affordable.

America is a great country. We are a very resourceful people. Most of us work very hard to provide for ourselves and our families. We should be smart enough to know how to provide high quality, and affordable, health care to all of our citizens. It may cost us more in the present but it will pay big dividends down the road.